VIRTUAL TOUR

YOUR VIRTUAL VISIT # 7 to the AUSTRALIAN ARMY MUSEUM OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

The Australian Army Museum of Western Australia is temporarily closed for public visits in support of mitigation measures and social distancing during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

This does not mean that you will miss out completely on a museum experience. Each week, the Museum will present an object from the collection and tell its story. Included will be links and related material which will allow you, your family or friends to continue a journey of self-discovery.  Enjoy the experience and stay well.

Photo and Medal Group of Sister Alicia Kelly MM, AARC

  

DESCRIPTION

Studio portrait of Alicia Mary Kelly on completion of training at (Royal) Melbourne Hospital in 1910. Ribbon bar with Military Medal (MM), 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal. Medal and ribbon of the Associate of the Royal Red Cross (ARRC). Sister Kelly was one of only seven Australian nurses to be awarded the Military Medal during World War One. Also in the collection is her nurse’s cape and a number of personal items. The location of her French Croix de Guerre is not known.

HISTORICAL INFORMATION

Alicia Mary Kelly was born on 16 September 1874 at Galway, Ireland. Nothing is known of her childhood or migration. She completed nursing training at the (Royal) Melbourne Hospital in 1910.

 On 29 March 1915, aged 29, (actual age 41) Alicia Kelly enlisted in the Australian Army Nursing Service, Australian Imperial Force. In April she embarked with reinforcements for the 1st Australian General Hospital. She reached Egypt in time to receive the thousands of wounded after the landing at Gallipoli. From 28 August until December 1915 she made at least two trips on Euripides, transporting severely wounded men home to Australia.

 In April 1916 she was posted to France serving with the 1st A.G.H. and the 29th Casualty Clearing Station and on 31 July was transferred to the 3rd Australian Casualty Clearing Station. It was there she was awarded the Military Medal for ‘conspicuous gallantry under fire’. Sister Kelly was on duty at the 3rd A.C.C.S. during an air raid. Orders evacuated the medical staff as bombs fell. A padre discovered Sister Kelly sitting in one of the hospital tents holding a patient’s hand. When he asked why she had not left with the rest she answered ‘I couldn’t leave my patients’

From August Sister Kelly worked at the 3rd A.G.H. before returning to England in March 1918 for transport duty and then to Australia in May. After her discharge Alicia Kelly married Arthur Rupert Chipper, a corporal in the 10th Light Horse. After many years at Bullaring the Chippers moved to a farm at Narrogin.

At the outbreak of World War II, despite poor health deriving from her 1914-18 war experiences, Mrs Chipper returned to nursing and was appointed matron of the Old Women’s Home in West Midland (Woodbridge),.

LINKS FOR FURTHER ENJOYMENT

Visit the Australian Army Museum of Western Australia web site

https://armymuseumwa.com.au/

History of the Kelly Family by Alicia’s great-niece, Debbie McCauley

http://tauranga.kete.net.nz/remembering_war/topics/show/1536

Biographical and genealogical profile of Alicia Kelly

https://www.geni.com/people/SN-Alicia-Chipper/6000000023526264403

Police and Boer war service of Alicia’s brother Lieutenant John Bell Kelly

https://www.geni.com/people/Lieut-John-Kelly/6000000009422668491

Boer War and Australian Imperial Force service of Alicia’s brother George Arthur Kelly

https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=161326

http://tauranga.kete.net.nz/remembering_war/topics/show/2554

National Museum of Australia education worksheet on Irish Migration to Australia

https://www.nma.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/326177/NMA_Irish.pdf

What was medical treatment like for Australian soldiers in World War 1?

https://anzacportal.dva.gov.au/wars-and-missions/ww1/military-organisation/medical-treatment

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE MUSEUM COLLECTION

Australian Field Dressing Station during the Battle of Messine, 7 June 1917

https://anzac-22nd-battalion.com/hospitals-france/

German prisoners of war acting as stretcher bearers. Because of the dangers involved, these prisoners of war retained their helmets and gas masks.

1906 Geneva Convention for the Amelioration of the Condition of the Wounded and Sick in Armies in the Field.

https://ihl-databases.icrc.org/applic/ihl/ihl.nsf/Treaty.xsp?documentId=C64C3E521F5CC28FC12563CD002D6737&action=openDocument

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YOUR VIRTUAL DISCOVERY VISIT # 3 to the DEFENCE HERITAGE STORIES OF ROTTNEST ISLAND

Rottnest Island including the popular visitor attractions of the Museum, Oliver Hill, Signal Ridge and Kingstown is temporarily closed during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

 This does not mean that you will miss out on a heritage experience. Each week, the Defence Heritage Committee will present a photo and tell its story. Included will be links and related material which will allow you, your family or friends to continue a journey of self-discovery.  Enjoy the experience and stay well.

PHOTOGRAPH – FIRST AIRCRAFT TO ROTTNEST

 On 18 January 1930, a Klemm KL25 light aircraft with a float plane conversion was the first aircraft to fly to Rottnest. The plane was one of two operated by the Aerial Commerce Company, owned by HC Ittershagen. Among Ittershagen’s many business ventures was the agency for Lanz crude oil tractors. The letters …ANZ are just visible forward of the pilot’s cockpit. The two-seat configuration indicates that it was the plane delivered to Perth in November 1929.

As might be expected a Trove newspaper query reveals the extensive public interest created by this flight.  Search for Rottnest in January 1929 to find coverage. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/search?adv=y

HISTORICAL INFORMATION

 Several aviation companies were formed in Western Australia in the 1920s and 30s. The longest lasting and most successful of these companies was the Aerial Commerce Company, owned by HC Ittershagen. Among Ittershagen’s many business ventures was the agency for Lanz crude oil tractors which sold widely across Western Australia. He conceived of the idea of using light aeroplanes to carry mechanics and spare parts to provide his customers with a quick repair service and imported two Klemm light aeroplanes, initially with this in mind. He leased endowment land at West Subiaco, had it cleared for a small aerodrome and erected a hangar there. The first of his aeroplanes arrived in July and the second in November 1929.

Among many activities, these aeroplanes were used for hire and to fly to farm field days where Lanz tractors were demonstrated. HF Baker was Aerial Commerce’s first main pilot and he flew Ittershagen on many trips around the state.

LINKS FOR FURTHER ENJOYMENT

Western Australia’s failed airline companies

http://www.airwaysmuseum.com/Edmonds%20essay%20-%20WA%20failed%20airlines.htm

Thesis including section and photos of Lanz Bulldog tractor

https://ro.ecu.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=2436&context=theses_hons

A history of the Klemm KL25 family of aircraft

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klemm_Kl_25

Model Plans for the KL25 also produced as the BA Swallow in England

https://www.ebay.com.au/i/183759051982?chn=ps&norover=1&mkevt=1&mkrid=705-139619-5960-0&mkcid=2&itemid=183759051982&targetid=896057791431&device=c&mktype=pla&googleloc=9070612&poi=&campaignid=9772799703&mkgroupid=100117146376&rlsatarget=pla-896057791431&abcId=578876&merchantid=9442712&gclid=Cj0KCQjw-r71BRDuARIsAB7i_QPOcmAmi40d8ySWsyxCKqy2XqkR-JSye0J5Lr5zARhSRGoz73wGregaAj3jEALw_wcB

A Klemm 25 still flying at Bankstown

https://www.themissions1937.com.au/the-aeroplanes-and-whats-it-all-about/klemm-l25-vhuur/

First notification of flight in the later “Final Sporting Edition” of the Daily Mail. Note also spelling of Thompson Bay.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/83818678?searchTerm=Klemm%20AND%20(Rottnest)&searchLimits=exactPhrase|||anyWords=Rottnest|||notWords|||requestHandler|||dateFrom=1930-01-01|||dateTo=1930-01-31|||l-advcategory=Article|||l-word=*ignore*%7C*ignore*|||l-illustrated=*ignore*%7C*ignore*|||sortby

The 1929 Centenary Sydney to Perth Air Race

https://www.nhillaviationheritagecentre.com.au/nhill-anson-newsletter3

Image of the Rottnest aircraft in wheeled configuration from the collection of the State Library of Western Australia. The LANZ logo is clearly visible.

https://catalogue.slwa.wa.gov.au/record=b1920207~S6

Biography of Harry Frederick Baker

http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/baker-harry-frederick-12164

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YOUR VIRTUAL VISIT # 6 to the AUSTRALIAN ARMY MUSEUM OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

The Australian Army Museum of Western Australia is temporarily closed for public visits in support of mitigation measures and social distancing during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

This does not mean that you will miss out completely on a museum experience. Each week, the Museum will present an object from the collection and tell its story. Included will be links and related material which will allow you, your family or friends to continue a journey of self-discovery. Enjoy the experience and stay well.

10th Light Horse Guidon

DESCRIPTION

Crimson with gold fringes, swallow tailed end (traditional cavalry Guidon shape). In the centre a black swan within a circle inscribed “10th LIGHT HORSE (WAMI)”, across the lower portion of the circle a scroll inscribed with the regimental motto “PERCUTE ET PERCUTE VELOCITER”, the whole surrounded with a wreath of Australian wattle and surmounted by the Crown. In the upper canton the roman numeral “X”

Below the whole centrepiece is the regimental colour patch in black over gold diagonals in a rectangle and below that is the battle honour SOUTH AFRICA 1900-02.  Emblazoned on either side of the centrepiece are ten selected battle honours from the Great War: DEFENCE OF ANZAC, SARI BAIR, RUMANI, MAGHDABA-RAFAH, GAZA-BEERSHEBA, JERUSALEM, JORDAN (ES SALT), MEGIDDO, SHARON, DAMASCUS

HISTORICAL INFORMATION

The Guidon was presented by Harry Chauvel, GCMG, KCB on the Esplanade, Perth, 10 March 1928. It was consecrated by Senior Chaplain Archbishop C Riley, OBE, VD, DD. This Guidon was later carried by the post-World War Two unit, 10th West Australian Mounted Infantry, raised as a CMF unit of the Royal Australian Armoured Corps in 1949 as a direct successor unit to the above light horse regiment. This unit was re-designated as 10th Light Horse in 1956

The Guidon was laid up at the State War Memorial, King’s Park on 10 June 1967, following presentation of a new Guidon to 10th Light Horse in 1966. The Guidon was transferred to the Army Museum of Western Australia in 1988 as part of the Bicentenary Colours Project.

The battle honour for South Africa, for unknown reasons, was not included on the guidon when originally presented in 1928, and was not emblazoned on the Guidon until the early 1950’s. The battle honour “South Africa 1900-02” was granted under MO 123/1908 to 18th Australian Light Horse Regiment which was the predecessor Militia Light Horse regiment existing at the time. This battle honour appeared under 10th Light Horse Regiment in the Australian Army List from 1928 onwards. Having this battle honour added at a later date would explain why it is positioned on the lower portion of the guidon in the centre. At the time of approving battle honours for the Great War, the authorised position for any pre-existing South Africa battle honour was in the top left corner of the Guidon or colour, followed by the battle honours of the Great War. (AAO 112/1927).

 LINKS FOR FURTHER ENJOYMENT

 Visit the Australian Army Museum of Western Australia web site

https://armymuseumwa.com.au/

Discover the Tradition of Regimental Colours in the Australian Army

https://www.army.gov.au/our-history/traditions/colours-standards-guidons-and-banners

Read the headlines about the presentation

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/79224454?searchTerm=Guidon&searchLimits=dateFrom=1928-03-01|||dateTo=1928-03-31|||l-advstate=Western+Australia|||l-word=*ignore*%7C*ignore*|||l-illustrated=*ignore*%7C*ignore*

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/79221813?searchTerm=Guidon&searchLimits=dateFrom=1928-03-01|||dateTo=1928-03-31|||l-advstate=Western+Australia|||l-word=*ignore*%7C*ignore*|||l-illustrated=*ignore*%7C*ignore*

Battle of Megiddo in 1918 and in prophecyhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Megiddo_(1918)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armageddon

Did the 10th Light Horse enter Damascus before Lawrence of Arabia?https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/PL1444

Where did 10 Light Horse serve in World War 2?https://www.wanneroo.wa.gov.au/info/20058/museums_culture_and_arts/133/10th_lig      ht_horse_trail
PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE MUSEUM COLLECTION

Light Horseman, his Waler and equipment in Sinai

https://veteranssa.sa.gov.au/story/battle-of-romani/

10 Light Horse Memorial in Kings Park and Botanic Garden. {Photo by D Blumer) https://www.bgpa.wa.gov.au/kings-park/visit/history/memorials

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YOUR VIRTUAL DISCOVERY VISIT # 2 to the DEFENCE HERITAGE STORIES OF ROTTNEST ISLAND

Rottnest Island including the popular visitor attractions of the Museum, Oliver Hill, Signal Ridge and Kingstown is temporarily closed during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

 This does not mean that you will miss out on a heritage experience. Each week, the Defence Heritage Committee will present a photo and tell its story. Included will be links and related material which will allow you, your family or friends to continue a journey of self-discovery. Enjoy the experience and stay well.

 GARRISON ARTILLERY AND FORTRESS ENGINEERS

TELLING THEM APART IN COLOUR AND BLACK AND WHITE

               

Depicted are dress tunics of the Royal Australian Artillery (L) and the Royal Australian Engineers (R). The 6th Heavy Battery and 5th Fortress Company were the Permanent Force Artillery and Engineer units which manned the coast defences on Rottnest Island. The military heritage collection of the Rottnest Island Authority contains many uniforms representing the individuals and units which have served on the Island from 1829 to the present. Unfortunately, the requirements of conservation and space mean that to date most of this collection remains in storage and is accessible only through photographs. This virtual visit will help you identify the uniforms you may see in exhibitions at the Museum and military sites when you can once again enjoy our favourite Island.

 HISTORICAL INFORMATION

Uniforms are most effectively displayed in 3D on mannequins. This permits the presentation of the complete ensemble including tunic, trousers, headgear, footwear, weapons and accoutrements. When considerations of universal access, visitor flow and sight lines are taken into account, these exhibits may require considerable space, a commodity often limited in heritage buildings. Textiles and other uniform elements are vulnerable to deterioration through light, dust, insect pests and other environmental hazards. A controlled and buffered environment in a display case is usually necessary to ensure conservation of the objects.  For these two reasons only a relatively few uniforms from the collection are displayed and these are periodically rotated.

Reliance on photographs can lead to confusion and misidentification as differences are often in the detail. In colour, the blue of the artillery tunic is quite distinct from the red of the engineers but as the photo above shows this is not always readily evident in black and white period photographs. [Two uniforms on the Left are Artillery, the one on the Right, Engineers].

All is not lost as other differences are sometimes quite obvious. As a mounted corps, Artillery has a ball filial, [the knob on top],  on its helmet; Engineers a spike. The reason is of course so you won’t injure your horse when you bend underneath to tighten the girth.

Army   honours and distinctions often make Corps distinctions quite subtle. Neither the Artillery nor the Engineers carry colours or guidons but instead share the same Battle Honour – UBIQUE – Latin for Everywhere. They also share the Grenade badge but with a minor difference

 

The Engineer badge has 9 flames, the Artillery 7.

Both Artillery and Engineers have sleeve braid in the form of an Austrian knot but this may be gold lace, yellow worsted or red worsted depending on rank and corps, with Sappers normally red and Gunners yellow worsted.

When the Rottnest Island Museum reopens, there will be a new folder of defence heritage photographs for you to test your uniform identification skills.

LINKS FOR FURTHER ENJOYMENT

Learn more about the military history of Rottnest Island.https://www.rottnestisland.com/the-island/about-the-island/our-history/military

Why did Engineering Australia recognise the significance of Fortress Fremantle

https://portal.engineersaustralia.org.au/heritage/fremantle-fortress-rottnest-island-ww2-coastal-defence-facilities-1941

History of Sappers in the West.

https://www.ozatwar.com/books/sappers.htm

Before the Engineers, there were Sappers and Miners

https://fremantlestuff.info/organisations/engineers.html

Girt by sea but defended by guns – Coast Artillery defences in World War 2

https://www.ozatwar.com/locations/coastalguns.htm

Further reading as an antidote to social distancing

https://booksonwaraustralia.com/medals-badges-uniforms-1914-18-military-books/1567-preserving-our-proud-heritage-the-customs-and-traditions-of-the-australian-army.html

Do you have the patience and skills to start a new hobby – military models?

https://www.metrohobbies.com.au/pages/model-kits

You too can dress the part.

https://thehistorybunker.co.uk/UNIFORMS%20OF%20THE%20BRITISH%20EMPIRE

Anzac Day Service in front of Rottnest Tea Rooms, Thomson Bay Settlement 1938

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YOUR VIRTUAL VISIT # 5 to the AUSTRALIAN ARMY MUSEUM OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

The Australian Army Museum of Western Australia is temporarily closed for public visits in support of mitigation measures and social distancing during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

This does not mean that you will miss out completely on a museum experience. Each week, the Museum will present an object from the collection and tell its story. Included will be links and related material which will allow you, your family or friends to continue a journey of self-discovery.           Enjoy the experience and stay well.

HMS Louis Gallipoli Souvenir

DESCRIPTION

HMS Louis relic from Gallipoli salvaged and carved by Petty Officer Alfred Siggs of Leederville. At the time of collecting this souvenir, Petty Officer Siggs was a member of the Royal Australian Navy Bridging Team. He was killed in action at Pozieres, France on 29 July 1916, aged just 20 and is buried in Puchevillers British Cemetery.

HMS Louis was wrecked in Suvla Bay on 31 October 1915. A Court Martial convened on 3 – 4 December, 1915 proved a charge that Lieutenant Commander Harold D. Adair-Hall had negligently or by default stranded the ship.                                 

HISTORICAL INFORMATION

HMS Louis was wrecked at Suvla Bay on 31 October 1915 during the Gallipoli campaign. Petty Officer Alfred Siggs from Leederville was stationed at Suvla Bay, to the north of Anzac Cove, with the Royal Australian Navy Bridging Train (RANBT). Siggs was one of the RANBT members who attempted to salvage the ship, which had been much damaged by Turkish artillery. Siggs later transferred to the Australian Imperial Force with the rank of Lance Corporal. He was killed in action at Pozieres, France on 29 July 1916, aged just 20. He is buried in Puchevillers British Cemetery, France.

The Royal Australian Navy Bridging Train was a unique unit of the Royal Australian Navy.  It was active only during World War One where it served in the Gallipoli and the Sinai and Palestine campaigns. The Train was formed in February 1915 and stood down in May 1917. Throughout its existence, it was composed of RAN Reservists under the command of Lieutenant Commander Leighton Bracegirdle.

In the early stages of the war, many of the 8,000 Australian naval reservists were not trained suitably to serve on board ships in the RAN. They found themselves doing odd jobs like guarding the wharfs, practicing minesweeping, watching out for saboteurs and a myriad of other odd jobs and minor duties. Then someone hit on a good idea. Since the reservists were capable of sailing about in small boats, and had some technical training, they should be able to operate pontoon bridging trains.

Sailors who volunteered swapped their naval uniforms for khaki and found themselves being given crash-courses in horsemanship, engineering and pontoon bridging, Advanced technical training in Australia was a problem due to lack of equipment and expertise. Accordingly, the RANBT was loaded on to ships in late May 1915 with the assurance that they could learn more effectively in training camps in England.. However, they were off-loaded in Egypt like the rest of the Anzacs. The RANBT was sent to reinforce the stalled invasion force at Suvla Bay.

HMS Louis was part of a class of 22 torpedo boat destroyers designated as the Laforey (later L) class. Twenty including HMS Louis were built between 1912 – 14. All served during World War I during which three were lost. The survivors were all scrapped in 1921-23.

 LINKS FOR FURTHER ENJOYMENT

 Visit the Australian Army Museum of Western Australia web site

https://armymuseumwa.com.au/

Service records of Roland Alfred Siggs

https://discoveringanzacs.naa.gov.au/browse/person/316714

Australian Red Cross Missing and Wounded Enquiry Bureau file for Alfred Siggs

https://s3-ap-southeast-2.amazonaws.com/awm-media/collection/RCDIG1057715/document/5645444.PDF

Explore the National Maritime Museum’s diorama of the Royal Australian Navy Bridging Team at Suvla Bay during the Gallipoli Campaign

https://www.sea.museum/2014/12/19/exploring-a-diorama-the-ran-bridging-train-at-suvla-bay-during-the-gallipoli-campaign

The naval career of Harold Dallas Adair-Hall

http://www.dreadnoughtproject.org/tfs/index.php/Harold_Dallas_Adair-Hall

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE MUSEUM COLLECTION

HMS Louis stranded in Suvla Bay.

Memorial plaque in honour of Lance Corporal Siggs in the Kings Park Honour Avenue.

 

https://www.bgpa.wa.gov.au/honour-avenues-plaques

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YOUR VIRTUAL DISCOVERY VISIT # 1 to the DEFENCE HERITAGE STORIES OF ROTTNEST ISLAND

Rottnest Island including the popular visitor attractions of the Museum, Oliver Hill, Signal Ridge and Kingstown is temporarily closed during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

This does not mean that you need miss out on a heritage experience. Each week, the Defence Heritage Committee will present a photo and tell its story. Included will be links and related material which will allow you, your family or friends to continue a journey of self-discovery. Enjoy the experience and stay well.

 PHOTOGRAPH – HEAVY GIN (GYN) IS NOT A DRINK

 

A 6 inch Mk XI barrel on the railway trolley, ready to be lifted off and moved onto the gun position at Bickley Battery. The lifting equipment is a heavy gyn or sheer legs on which can be seen the hardwood windlass (lignum vitae) ratchet pawls and handspike sockets.

HISTORICAL INFORMATION

Gin poles, sheer legs, gyns, derricks and tripods are forms of lifting devices differentiated by the number of guy wires and fixed legs, For lifting heavy objects, gin poles and sheer legs have proved a valuable tool for centuries.

A gyn or gin pole is a supported pole that uses a pulley or block and tackle on its upper end to lift loads. The lower end is braced or set in a shallow hole and positioned so the upper end lies above the object to be lifted. The pole is secured with three or more guy-wires. Sheer legs were commonly a pair of legs joined at the top, frequently used for masting ships, installing engines, boilers and lifting other heavy objects.

The barrel of a 6 inch Mark XI coast artillery gun weighed just over 7,600 kilos and so a tripod together with the mechanical advantage of a block and tackle were necessary to lift and position the barrel. The windlass and ratchets allowed the barrel to be raised gradually and held in place between rotations.

In the photo note the following:

  • The simple improvised railway running gear used to move the barrel along the rail lines;
  • The centre of gravity closer to the breech end of the barrel mass which determined its positioning on the running gear;
  • The camouflage colour scheme of the guns as initially installed at Bickley;
  • The Crayfish engine to the right edge of the view (watch for future info on the story of the Crayfish and Crab engines);
  • The use of heavy manila rope as the hoisting means; and
  • The safety ropes tying the third leg to prevent kick out.

 LINKS FOR FURTHER ENJOYMENT

 Lignum-vitae, the heaviest and hardest wood in the world.

https://www.wood-database.com/lignum-vitae/

How does a block and tackle make work easier?

https://science.howstuffworks.com/transport/engines-equipment/pulley.htm

Did you know that the derrick was named for an English executioner in the reign of Elizabeth I

https://www.towerclimber.com/gin-poles/

How does a ratchet work?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ratchet_(device)

How to build a flying fox using sheer legs (go to page 19)

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=2KD7dZhfY6wC&pg=PA18&lpg=PA18&dq=Build+a+model+sheer+legs&source=bl&ots=it3rOrOqPd&sig=ACfU3U1Bbs6Wx90GKDv6Wk0g7mMZaREaEA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjY0sub2vroAhWtxjgGHfjAAaYQ6AEwFXoECAsQAQ#v=onepage&q=Build%20a%20model%20sheer%20legs&f=false

Video – Attempt to remove masts of SS Great Britain using sheer legs (see minute 30)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7F6aDdHPJfI

Advantages of manila rope.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manila_rope

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YOUR VIRTUAL VISIT # 4 to the AUSTRALIAN ARMY MUSEUM OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

The Australian Army Museum of Western Australia is temporarily closed for public visits in support of mitigation measures and social distancing during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

This does not mean that you will miss out completely on a museum experience. Each week, the Museum will present an object from the collection and tell its story. Included will be links and related material which will allow you, your family or friends to continue a journey of self-discovery. Enjoy the experience and stay well.

World War One Diorama of Australian Light Horse as Part of Egyptian Expeditionary Force to Damascus

DESCRIPTION

1:1 scale diorama showing mounted trooper of 10th Australian Light Horse Regiment in Palestine 1918 and dismounted Ottoman soldier. This diorama is the central feature in the World War 1 Gallery – Middle East Campaigns sequence and shows typical uniforms and accoutrements of the Australian Light Horse and Ottoman infantry. L 5 metres W 3 metres H 3 metres                                            

 HISTORICAL INFORMATION

 The unit was raised as a squadron, then a regiment in October 1914.and formed part of the 3rd Light Horse Brigade in Egypt. The Regiment served dismounted in Gallipoli and fought at the charge at the Nek on 7 August 1915, and at Hill 60 on 29-30 August. The only Victoria Cross awarded to a Light Horseman recognised the valour of Lieutenant Hugo Throssell at Hill 60.

After Gallipoli the Regiment was bought up to strength to defended Egypt from the Ottoman Army advancing on the Suez Canal. Through 1916 they drove the Turks across the deserts of Sinai, participating in the battles of Romani and Magdhaba.

 In 1917 as part of the Desert Column they advanced into Palestine and participated in the bloody battles to break the Gaza-Beersheba line and helped capture Jerusalem. They participated in the Es Salt Raid in May 1918. In August they were equipped with swords and retrained as cavalry. In this role they took part in the rout of the Ottoman army in the Jordan Valley, a campaign the light horse referred to as “The Great Ride”. In September the 10th was the first formed regiment to enter Damascus.

Turkey surrendered on 30 October 1918. After the end of the war, the regiment saw action in putting down the Egyptian uprising of 1919. The Regiment was one of the few to return home as a formed unit.

 LINKS FOR FURTHER ENJOYMENT

 Visit the Australian Army Museum of Western Australia web site

https://armymuseumwa.com.au/

History of 10 Light Horse Regiment in World War 1 including “The Great Ride”

https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/U51044/

History of Australian Walers as war horses in World War One

https://www.awm.gov.au/articles/encyclopedia/horses

How did Light Horse differ from Cavalry?

https://anzacportal.dva.gov.au/wars-and-missions/ww1/military-organisation/australian-imperial-force/australian-light-horse

A bus shelter to honour a Victoria Cross recipient?

https://monumentaustralia.org.au/themes/people/military/display/60561-captain-hugo-throssell-v.c.

The Great Ride remembered – Trooper Ned Moriarty

https://www.swtimes.com.au/news/south-western-times/great-ride-remembered-ng-b88992779z

Experience of the Ottoman soldier in World War One

https://nzhistory.govt.nz/war/ottoman-empire/turkish-soldier-experience

Reflections on the charge at Beersheba

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/postcolonial-blog/2017/oct/30/beersheba-centenary-lets-remember-that-story-is-not-the-same-as-history

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE MUSEUM COLLECTION

 Webley Mark IV Revolver.

http://www.lighthorse.org.au/h-v-h-throssell/

https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/REL/11836/

 Kings Park Honour Avenue Database

https://www.bgpa.wa.gov.au/honour-avenues-plaques

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YOUR VIRTUAL VISIT # 3 to the AUSTRALIAN ARMY MUSEUM OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

The Australian Army Museum of Western Australia is temporarily closed for public visits in support of mitigation measures and social distancing during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

This does not mean that you will miss out completely on a museum experience. Each week, the Museum will present an object from the collection and tell its story. Included will be links and related material which will allow you, your family or friends to continue a journey of self-discovery. Enjoy the experience and stay well.

 3400 Sergeant John Alexander Spence DCM, MM, 52 Battalion AIF

 DESCRIPTION

Post card sized photo of 3400 Sergeant John Alexander Spence DCM, MM, 52 Battalion AIF. Photo shows medal ribbons of Distinguished Conduct Medal (awarded June 1917) and Military Medal (awarded April 1918), 2 wound stripes, 5 service stripes, 52 Battalion AIF colour patch and soft style forage cap.

John Alexander Spence was born in Fremantle 2nd July 1893 and died on 20 November 1962 at Hollywood Repatriation Hospital aged 69.

 HISTORICAL INFORMATION

In 1912 John Alexander Spence joined the Australian Navy as a Stoker and was posted to H.M.A.S. Australia. He was on this ship when it sailed at the head of the convoy into Sydney Harbour in 1913. At the outbreak of WW1, his ship was sent to German New Guinea where he saw conflict with the enemy and received a gunshot wound to his hand. He was returned to Australia and the Naval doctors considered him unfit for further Naval service.

When his hand healed Spence joined the AIF on the 2 August 1915 and was posted to the 52nd Battalion and embarked on the Benalla on the 1 November 1915. He was promoted to Lance Corporal on the 1 June 1916 on 9 September was promoted to Corporal and the next day to Sergeant. At Messines Ridge he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. At Dernancourt, a village near Villers he was awarded the Military Medal on 6 April 1918.

Subsequently he was badly injured. He had captured four German soldiers and one Officer. While marching them back to the Allied lines the Officer grabbed one of the patrol member’s gun and fired three shots at Sergeant Spence which smashed his hip. Despite his injuries Spence managed to bring the Officer down with a revolver shot.

 On the 30th April he was repatriated to England and admitted to the Alexandria Hospital at Cosham. He was eventually returned to Australia on board the Somalia arriving home on the 21st December 1919.

Before enlisting, Spence was a prominent amateur boxer, a pupil of the renowned heavyweight Bill Doherty. During WW1 he won the Army lightweight championship, competing against professionals as well as amateurs. He defended the title successfully for three successive years. On his discharge from the Army he fought under the name of Sonny Kidson. He also turned to coaching and had remarkable success having coached the Army and Navy boxing teams.

LINKS FOR FURTHER ENJOYMENT

Visit the Australian Army Museum of Western Australia web site

https://armymuseumwa.com.au/

Discover the war record if 52 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force

https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/U51492/

Australian Imperial Force Project – Summary for Spence including Medal Citations

https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=284129

Family history of John Alexander Spence from Historical Society of Rockingham Districts newsletter “Between the Lines” (Page 10)

http://fhsrd.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/BTL-June-2014-Archived.pdf

 Never heard of Bill Doherty, the Coolgardie Cyclone?

https://boxrec.com/media/index.php/Bill_Doherty

 How does Australia recognise acts of bravery?

https://www.gg.gov.au/australian-honours-and-awards/australian-bravery-decorations

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE MUSEUM COLLECTION

 John Alexander Spence identified in photo from the Thuillier collection of glass plate negatives. Taken by Louis and Antoinette Thuillier in Vignacourt, France during the period 1916 to 1918.

AWM Collection

https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C1294057

The 52nd Battalion A.I.F. by Neville Browning

This book contains a history of the 52nd Battalion AIF, from its formation in Egypt in early 1916, to its disbandment in May 1918. The 52nd Battalion fought in many Western Front battles, including Mouquet Farm, Third Ypres and Villers-Bretonneux.

https://shop.histwest.org.au/52nd-battalion-aif-the-378.html

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YOUR VIRTUAL VISIT # 2 to the AUSTRALIAN ARMY MUSEUM OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

The Australian Army Museum of Western Australia is temporarily closed for public visits in support of mitigation measures and social distancing during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

This does not mean that you will miss out completely on a museum experience. Each week, the Museum will present an object from the collection and tell its story. Included will be links and related material which will allow you, your family or friends to continue a journey of self-discovery. Enjoy the experience and stay well.

 Large Technology Collection – M3 Stuart Light Tank

 DESCRIPTION

The M3 Stuart, officially Light Tank, M3, was an American light tank of World War II.. It was supplied to British and other Commonwealth forces under lend-lease prior to the entry of the U.S. into the war. Thereafter, it was used by US, Australian. and Allied forces until the end of the war.

 With a crew of 4, it is armed with a 37 mm gun and a coaxial machine gun and weighs 12,500 kilograms. It is powered by a Continental W-670 250 horsepower engine, gasoline fueled, giving it a top speed of 58 kilometers per hour and a range of 112 kilometers. The Stuart saw Australian service in North Africa, Australia and New Guinea.

The British service name “Stuart” came from the Civil War Confederate general JEB Stuart, a renowned cavalry commander..

HISTORICAL INFORMATION

Beginning in 1939, the 2nd Australian Imperial Force divisions included a cavalry reconnaissance regiment equipped with light tanks and scout carriers. Only three regiments were eventually formed as it was believed that the 8th Division did not need armoured support in Malaya in the jungle. 

The cavalry regiments of the 2nd AIF divisions operating in Mediterranean theatre were initially equipped with the Universal Carrier and unarmoured trucks before being progressively mechanised using British Army equipment. Only the 9th Division received Stuarts in North Africa.

The Australian 1st Armoured Division was raised in 1941 as part of the 2nd AIF. Intended to be deployed to North Africa in late 1941, it was retained in Australia following the outbreak of the Pacific War. The Division’s armoured regiments subsequently began re-equipping with M3 Grant medium tanks and M3 Stuart light tanks in April and May 1942.

The 2/6th Armoured Regiment deployed to Port Moresby and Milne Bay in New Guinea in September 1942. In December two squadrons were subsequently shipped to Buna on the north coast of Papua. The lightly armoured M3 Stuart tanks proved to be unsuited to jungle warfare and suffered heavy casualties, but played an important role at Buna between December 1942 and January 1943

In January 1943, the remainder of the division deployed to Western Australia between Perth and Geraldton, Western Australia as part of III Corps, tasked to counter a Japanese invasion The 1st Armoured Division formed a key element of Australia’s mainland defences, but after that threat passed in September 1943, it was disbanded

 LINKS FOR FURTHER ENJOYMENT

 Visit the Australian Army Museum of Western Australia web site

https://armymuseumwa.com.au/

Discover the story of Australian armour in the Middle East 1940 – 42

Https://Www.Army.Gov.Au/Our-History/History-In-Focus/Australian-Armour-In-The-Middle-East-1940-To-1943

Build your own 1/35th scale model of a Stuart tank

https://www.metrohobbies.com.au/products/tamiya-1-35-m3-stuart-late-production-tank

 Build your own 1/72nd scale model of a Stuart tank

https://www.frontlinehobbies.com.au/hasegawa-1-72-light-tank-m3-stuart-mk.i-plastic-ki   

Wartime Perth as an inspiration for mystery novels

https://www.nla.gov.au/content/the-landscape-of-the-past-wartime-perth-as-a-backdrop-to-mystery

Evacuation of 80,000 considered for wartime Perth

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/95182115?searchTerm=Gordon%20Bennett&searchLimits=exactPhrase|||anyWords|||notWords|||requestHandler|||dateFrom=1943-01-01|||dateTo=1943-12-31|||l-advstate=Western+Australia|||l-word=*ignore*%7C*ignore*|||sortby

 PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE MUSEUM COLLECTION

Get an overview of the battles for Buna, Gona and Sanananda

https://anzacportal.dva.gov.au/wars-and-missions/kokoda-track-1942-1943/events/japanese-besieged-battle-beachheads-buna-gona-sanananda

It is amazing where the Continental W-670 engine was used.

http://www.all-aero.com/index.php/contactus/64-engines-power/12610-continental-r-670-w-670

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YOUR VIRTUAL VISIT # 1 to the AUSTRALIAN ARMY MUSEUM OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

The Australian Army Museum of Western Australia is temporarily closed for public visits in support of mitigation measures and social distancing during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

This does not mean that you will miss out completely on a museum experience. Each week, the Museum will present an object from the collection and tell its story. Included will be links and related material which will allow you, your family or friends to continue a journey of self-discovery.    Enjoy the experience and stay well.

Regimental Colour, 1st Battalion

11th Australian Infantry Regiment (Perth Regiment)

DESCRIPTION

Red George Cross on a white background with red and white fringe. In the center the regimental badge in gold within a wreath of Western Australian kangaroo paw and banksia, surmounted by the Crown. Below the wreath is the Battle Honour “SOUTH AFRICA 1900-02”. In the upper canton is the roman numeral “I”.  (Note:- The official Battle Honour for South Africa granted to 11th Australian Infantry Regiment under Military Order 123/1908 and subsequently published in the Australian Army List, was “South Africa 1899-1902”)

HISTORICAL INFORMATION

 Purchased from Regimental funds in 1910 and presented by HE the Governor of WA Sir Gerald Strickland, KCMG, at a parade held on the Esplanade, Perth, 18 February 1911. Consecrated by the Right Reverend Colonel. Riley, DD, VD, Senior Chaplain of the Australian Commonwealth Military Forces.

 This colour was subsequently inherited by successor units to the 11th Australian Infantry Regiment (Perth Regiment), including 88th (Perth) Infantry, 11th Battalion (The Perth Regiment) and 11th/16th Battalion. The colour was handed over to the Perth City Council at a special parade of the 11th/16th Battalion held in Forrest Place on 7 June 1930, and was laid up in the Council Chambers in Murray Street.

Together with the other historic colours handed over at the time, this colour later went into storage when Council moved premises in the early 1960’s. Perth City Council had some restoration work carried out on these colours in 1975 and later had them on display in their display room at Council House, St Georges Terrace. They were subsequently placed in storage again. Following negotiations by the Army Museum of WA Perth City Council passed on these colours to the Museum in November 1993 where they are on display in the Traditions Gallery.

 LINKS FOR FURTHER ENJOYMENT

 Visit the Australian Army Museum of Western Australia web site

https://armymuseumwa.com.au/

Discover the Tradition of Regimental Colours in the Australian Army

https://www.army.gov.au/our-history/traditions/colours-standards-guidons-and-banners

Read the headlines about the presentation

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/26303699?searchTerm=colours%20AND%20%22presentation%22%20AND%20(parade)&searchLimits=exactPhrase=presentation|||anyWords=parade|||notWords|||requestHandler|||dateFrom=1911-02-10|||dateTo=1911-02-24|||l-advstate=Western+Australia|||l-word=*ignore*%7C*ignore*|||l-illustrated=*ignore*%7C*ignore*|||sortby

Did one of your ancestors serve in the Boer War?

http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/military/bor-wa1.htm#wa1

11 Battalion. Australian Imperial Force departing Fremantle, October 1914

https://11btn.wags.org.au/index.php/indexes/11bn-embarkation

Was 11 Battalion, AIF at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915?

https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/U51451

Were soldiers from 2/11th Battalion captured at Crete in 1941?

https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/U56054

St John the Theologian Memorial Chapel in Prevelly Western Australia

http://inherit.stateheritage.wa.gov.au/Public/Inventory/Details/3b1383f6-7a09-4b6e-af6f-a4cc5d23ce8a

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE MUSEUM COLLECTION

 Commemoration of action on 9 February 1900 at West Australian Hill,

https://www.boerwarwa.org.au/news/why-datasouth-has-embraced-concrete5-cms-development-new-websites

Group portrait of the Australian 11th (Western Australia) Battalion, 3rd Infantry Brigade, Australian Imperial Force posing on the Great Pyramid of Giza on 10 January 1915.

https://11btn.wags.org.au/index.php/photo-id-grid